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South Carolina House of Representative Official Records Actually Stating Laws Were Models Created by AMERICAN LEGISLATIVE EXCHANGE COUNCIL (ALEC), a Look at the Years 1996-2012

This is a list of the South Carolina House of Representatives and ALEC mentioned in official documents.

2012 (Session 119) Tuesday, February 21, 2012

INVITATIONS
On motion of Rep. BARFIELD, with unanimous consent, the following were taken up for immediate consideration and accepted:

February 16, 2012
House Invitations Committee
503A Blatt Building
Columbia, South Carolina 29201

Dear Committee:

On behalf of the American Legislative Exchange Council, the Members and staff of the House of Representatives are invited to a Legislative Reception. This event will be held on Tuesday, March 6, 2012, from 6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. at the Clarion Hotel.

Sincerely,
Liston D. Barfield, Secretary
American Exchange Legislative Council Board of Trustees

2011 (Session 119) Tuesday, January 25, 2011

INVITATIONS
On motion of Rep. BARFIELD, with unanimous consent, the following were taken up for immediate consideration and accepted:

January 25, 2011
House Invitations & Memorial Resolutions Committee
503-A Blatt Building
Columbia, South Carolina 29201

Members of the Invitations & Memorial Resolutions Committee:

On behalf of the American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC), the Members and staff of the House of Representatives are invited to a Legislative Reception. This event will be held on Wednesday, February 23, 2011, from 7:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. at the Clarion Town House Hotel.

Sincerely,
Liston D. Barfield
State Chair

2010 (Session 118) Thursday, February 18, 2010

INVITATIONS
On motion of Rep. KIRSH, with unanimous consent, the following were taken up for immediate consideration and accepted:

February 18, 2010
The Honorable Herb Kirsh
Chairman, House Invitations Committee
503-A Blatt Building
Columbia, South Carolina 29201

Dear Chairman Kirsh:

On behalf of the American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC), the Members and staff of the House of Representatives are invited to a Legislative Reception. This event will be held on Wednesday, March 3, 2010, from 6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. at the Clarion Townhouse Hotel.

Sincerely,
Frank Rogers
State Chair

2010 (Session 118) Tuesday, February 2, 2010

Issues, Ideas, Concepts, and Solutions Not Adopted by Sentencing Reform Commission
There were many ideas, issues, concepts, and possible solutions to problems that were presented to both the Sentencing Reform Commission and the different Work Groups in the many meetings that were held from February 2009 to January 2010. For a variety of reasons, not all were adopted as a recommendation for the Final Report. However, in an effort to make this report useful for the long-term, as well as for the immediate time period, the Sentencing Reform Commission has decided to include this section in the report itemizing, and in some instances, giving details on those ideas and issues that were not adopted as recommendations. The following list was not voted on by the SRC and is not arranged in any special order.

Total of 24, this was found in number 14 in a proposed model from ALEC

14. Conditional Post-Conviction Release Bond Act: Proposed model legislation presented by Senator Mike Rose, obtained from the American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC), was offered as an alternative to current laws allowing furloughs of inmates under certain conditions. The proposed legislation would allow appropriately selected inmates to be released from confinement and would use performance bonds and security and indemnity agreements with family members to keep participants from committing new crimes and assure their prompt return to custody if the terms of the performance bonds or indemnity agreements were violated. The performance bond could contain requirements such as house arrest, drug testing, recovery program participation, mandatory reporting requirements, non-interference with witnesses or victims, maintenance of gainful employment, payment of restitution, and no subsequent arrests. The process would also mandate family members’ participation by requiring them to be parties to the indemnity agreements, in order to possess a monetary incentive to encourage compliance by the participant.

Conclusion
South Carolina faces critical problems with increasing numbers of repeat offenders, costs of increasing prison populations, the financial costs of building new prisons, insufficient alternatives to incarceration, and a probation and parole system that is inadequately trained and ill equipped with the tools to best utilize their resources.

The detailed Recommendations List provides the majority of conclusions from the Sentencing Reform Commission, but they are only the beginning. The Commission intends to introduce legislation to implement many of the recommendations.

If all recommendations are enacted and fully funded, instead of facing additional five-year operating costs of $141 million, the state may save as much as $92 million from diversion of non-violent offenders from prison beds to more appropriate and cost-effective forms of supervision. More importantly, enactment and funding of these recommendations may also be the key to turning offenders who now pose a tax burden into tax-paying contributing members of society.

The Commission acknowledges that, in the current economic climate, many of the funding requests and changes in methodology may not be immediately available. However, it is imperative that they not be forgotten. It is only through a systemic and total review of all of the correctional system that whole-sale changes can be made for the better and with no unintended consequences.

As stated previously, the Commission’s ultimate goals are to make South Carolina better and safer; reduce recidivism and the revolving door to the prisons; provide fair and effective sentencing options, use tax dollars wisely, and improve public safety by ensuring that prison beds are available for violent offenders who need to be in prison and remain in prison. We believe the strategies we propose in the report meet that challenge.

RESPECTFULLY SUBMITTED,
Sen. Gerald Malloy, Chair Rep. R. Keith Kelly
Sen. John M. “Jake” Knotts, Jr. Justice Donald W. Beatty
Sen. George E. “Chip” Campsen III Judge Aphrodite K. Konduros
Rep. G. Murrell Smith, Jr. Judge William P. Keesley
Rep. Douglas Jennings, Jr. Jon Ozmint, Director SCDC
Received as information.

REGULATIONS RECEIVED

2009 (Session 118) Wednesday, May 20, 2009

5. Budget Does Not Provide Debt Relief or Sufficiently Address Unfunded Liabilities
At the end of the day, we believe legislative budget writers missed a tremendous opportunity this year to not only enact substantive reforms, but considerably reduce our state’s debt load. It is plain and simply foolish to unsustainably grow government without first paying down debt, and it’s equally foolish to make yet more political promises to increase retiree benefits that later must be paid for through tax increases.
The most notable debt that we have incurred is the over $20 billion in unfunded retiree pension benefits and health care costs. The Retirement System’s unfunded liability has grown in the past 10 years from $178 million in 1999 to $10.964 billion in 2008, which means that our Retirement System’s funding level has decreased from 99 percent to 69 percent in ten years. These numbers do not even reflect the huge losses – over $16 billion – that our retirement investments have suffered during the past year.
We’ve proposed changes to significantly reduce our liabilities, but these reforms have been largely rejected by the Legislature. For example, eliminating the TERI program would have not only generated $17 million in recurring savings for the general fund, but according to the Retirement System’s actuary, could have also reduced our unfunded liability by up to $550 million. Other proposals include increasing the amount of service years for retirement and taking a longer salary period for determining benefit payments would lead to annual savings. In our Executive Budget, we proposed reducing the employer surcharge for retiree health care costs and increasing retiree contributions for their insurance costs. Our proposal would have freed up to $62 million annually that could have been allocated to the retiree health care unfunded liability, lowering it by $2 billion. We believed that this was a reasonable measure given the fact that South Carolina taxpayers pay an average of $348 per month for retiree health care costs while the state of Florida pays a maximum of only $150 per month for their retiree health care costs.
We’d be remiss to not give legislators some credit for committing $3.2 million to the OPEB trust fund in this year’s budget. Unfortunately, this down payment falls significantly short of the $314 million that we needed to keep our unfunded liabilities from growing even larger.
This budget also does nothing to reduce our bonded indebtedness. According to ALEC, we rank fourth highest in the nation with regard to annual debt service as a percentage of state tax revenue. This is an important figure because it not only accounts for our state’s general obligation debt but also includes the total amount of local government and school district debt that must be paid by taxpayers in the form of property and local option taxes. Given the sizable amount of debt that we owe on a state and local basis, we believe that it is the responsible approach to use just 10 percent of the federal stimulus funds that South Carolina will receive to pay down outstanding bonds. One of our proposals would have reduced our state’s debt service by $162 million over the next two years and saved over $100 million in interest payments over the next thirteen years. This proposal would have freed up millions of dollars that could have been spent on essential government services on a recurring basis.
We believe we have laid out several reasonable and compelling arguments upon which to ask the General Assembly to take a second look at crafting a responsible budget. I urge legislators to limit the costly effects to state services and taxpayers that will inevitably come in one, two or even ten years by acting responsibly now. Let’s not miss another opportunity to get it right.
For the reasons set forth in the above sections, I am vetoing the following parts of the FY 2009-10 General Appropriations Bill:
Veto 1 Fiscal Year 2009-10 General Appropriation Act Part IA Funding, in its entirety, pages 1 – 281.

2009 (Session 118) Wednesday, May 20, 2009

1. Inclusion of State Fiscal Stabilization Funds Without Corresponding Debt Relief
For several months, I have laid out a clear marker for the General Assembly about where our administration is with regard to federal stimulus funds coming to our state: dedicate $700 million of state revenue to pay down state debt and I will apply for the equivalent amount in State Fiscal Stabilization Funds (SFS Funds). Unfortunately, the majority in the General Assembly failed to meet our marker, or for that matter, failed to even attempt to meet us part of the way. Instead, they have ignored the requirements of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA), opinions of the Obama Administration, the Congressional Research Service and our state Attorney General, which have upheld the Governor’s discretionary authority to apply for SFS Funds, and now, with H. 3560, are unconstitutionally attempting to force me to apply for the funds.
This is not the case with the growing and vocal group of legislators who understand the gravity of the problems that lie ahead in spending money we don’t have and actually won’t have in 24 months. I commend them for their support.
Our administration has remained steadfast and consistent over the past six years on the need for fiscal restraint and prudence. Our message on the use of stimulus funds is no different: spending an unprecedented amount of one-time federal funds on core, recurring needs without making sustainable budgetary and financial reforms, including paying down our high state debt load, allows the General Assembly to avoid the responsibility of making tough decisions. For this reason, explained in detail below, I am vetoing Part III of H. 3560 – appropriation of the State Fiscal Stabilization Fund.
Taking a Measured Approach
I did everything within my power to impede the federal stimulus legislation as it moved through Congress because I, along with almost every Republican Member of Congress in Washington, was concerned with the disastrous long-term consequences that would come from spending money we don’t have – and in issuing yet more debt to solve a problem that was created in the first place by too much debt. We lost that fight, and Congress passed the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act which would allow a total stimulus package of roughly $8 billion to come to our state.
Out of this $8 billion, we took what we believed was a reasonable and measured approach by asking both the Obama Administration and then the South Carolina General Assembly to use a small fraction – around 10 percent – to pay down our state’s high debt load. Again, while some in the Legislature would prefer the public to forget this fact, 90 percent of stimulus funds are reaching South Carolina – going to tax relief, building roads, and supporting schools.
We think it makes sense that when you get a financial windfall, it’s worth setting aside a small amount to pay down debt. If a prudent family were to win the lottery, the family wouldn’t go out and spend every dollar, but instead likely dedicate a portion of their winnings to paying down credit card debt or their mortgage, or in fact setting some aside for a rainy day.
It should not be any different for a state – particularly in South Carolina’s case where we are first in the Southeast, and fourth in the entire nation, in the percentage of tax revenue that goes not to teachers or health care, but debt repayment, according to a recent report by the American Legislative Exchange Council. Eleven percent of every dollar in yearly state tax revenue goes to paying down debt, and we have $20 billion on top of that in unfunded long-term political promises and commitments. Paying down debt would give us greater financial flexibility in 24 months when the federal gravy train runs out, at which time we could then use these saved funds to avert further cuts, increase spending on core functions, or set aside more for the tough times that are sure to come. In our case, it would also pay dividends well beyond the first 24 months because $162 million would be saved in debt service during this time and another $100 million in interest savings would occur over the next 13 years.
Avoiding the Inevitable Questions
Part III of this bill appropriates $348 million in non-recurring federal stimulus funds for core recurring needs – like the base student cost, higher education and public safety funding. What happens in 24 months when this funding stream ends? Will teachers and law enforcement officers lose their jobs then? These are questions that have not been answered by the General Assembly, and hoping things will have turned around by then is not a realistic or acceptable strategy. As United States Army General Gordon Sullivan tells us, hope is not a method.
Our answers have been the same for the past six years – implement budgetary reforms like spending caps, restructuring, retirement limits, and prioritize spending so that frontline services provided by teachers and police officers are adequately funded. Doing this requires that cuts be made to other non-core governmental programs, which I have proposed in each of our administration’s executive budgets and which the General Assembly has time and again failed to adopt.
The tough decisions that should have been made in this unparalleled budget year will once again be put off for another time, or possibly not at all, in the hopes that the economy will suddenly recover and our revenue stream will become flush with cash. This strategy has been used by the General Assembly time and again – the leadership waits for the Board of Economic Advisors to release a higher financial estimate or surprisingly finds a new, unsustainable revenue source and then they look like they have saved the day.
But this financial decline is much steeper and the recovery is likely to be much slower. Rather than continue the “let’s wait and see” method of appropriation, it is incumbent upon those of us in seats of responsibility to make wise – and sometimes tough – decisions to protect priority government services in the long term. On this front, I believe the Legislature has fallen far short yet again.
Pulling Back the Curtain
Some have argued that without federal stimulus funds, education and law enforcement will be severely cut, and no other way exists to replenish their funding. This has certainly resonated in terms of making a political point and scoring a public relations victory, as opponents to fiscal responsibility have chosen to perpetuate disingenuous doomsday scenarios as the result of dedicating a portion of the stimulus dollars to paying down debt.
The truth is less clear-cut and, perhaps, far less dramatic. Indeed, Part III of this appropriations bill dedicates the majority of State Fiscal Stabilization funds to education and law enforcement while at the same time gutting general fund expenditures for those areas so that, without this section of the budget, these core services will be drastically cut. As several more forthright legislators have pointed out, this strategy, by Senator Leatherman in particular, is meant to ensure that our administration is perceived as allowing draconian cuts to be made to these services by not applying for the last 10 percent of the stimulus monies. The doomsayers’ argument is disingenuous and without merit.
Budget writers in both the House and Senate could have done many things to sustain basic education, health care and law enforcement funding without using any of the $348 million in stimulus funds by (1) heeding our six-year call for sustainable government spending growth; (2) heeding our six-year call to prioritize spending so that core government services are adequately funded and other nonessential services are cut – because not all spending is created equal; and (3) working from the Ryberg-Davis alternative budget which would have limited expansions in unsustainable health care spending and increased funding for teachers and law enforcement agencies.
Legislative budget writers clearly missed several opportunities to put our financial house on a more solid foundation. Now, the same budget writers have once again missed a critical opportunity to correct their previous missteps by failing to send me a budget and legislative reforms that could alleviate future budget crises. Paying down our state’s high debt load will save millions, $162 million in the first two years alone; restructuring state government will remove duplicative costs; capping spending will reduce the high cost of government; and reforming the State Retirement System will lessen our liabilities. All of these reforms will help put our fiscal house in order, and not undertaking them represents a missed opportunity of monumental proportions.
Without these reforms or a down payment on our state’s $20 billion in unfunded liabilities, I cannot apply for State Fiscal Stabilization Funds, and I believe forcing me to do so with this legislation is legally invalid and unconstitutional. The General Assembly is taking this unprecedented step to undo federal law which clearly gives power only to governors to apply for SFS Funds and, in doing so, tramples on basic principles of separation of powers which requires the governor to carry out executive acts – in this case administering and applying for stimulus funds.
Core Functions of State Government are Inadequately Funded in Part IA
We are vetoing Part IA in its entirety because – as a stand-alone – Part IA inadequately funds core functions of state government. For several of these functions, General Fund levels were dangerously cut and backfilled with stimulus funds that will run dry in two years.
The result of this purely political maneuver – the so-called “Chaos Budget” – served its purpose: to scare the general public into believing teachers would be fired, troopers would be taken off the road, and health care would be slashed. An honest and responsible budget, following along the lines of the Ryberg-Davis alternative budget, would have fully funded the base student cost as well as law enforcement, and found a way to pay down debt.
Inadequate Funding for K-12 Education
Let me emphasize once again: budget writers’ purpose was seemingly to induce fear that would cause people to lobby our office to change its mind, and it’s disappointing, yet not entirely surprising, that those holding the legislative purse strings would prefer fear-mongering to responsible budgeting.
Such is the case with education, since budget writers consistently said that education could not be properly funded without every last stimulus dollar. Yet the alternative budget proposed by Senators Ryberg and Davis, and a handful of House Members, demonstrated that it was indeed possible to adequately fund K-12 education without using $348 million in State Fiscal Stabilization Funds while at the same time setting aside $200 million to pay down debt. In fact, the Ryberg-Davis budget would not have forced one teacher to lose his or her job.
It’s also important to remember that the debate over the 10 percent we believe should be dedicated to debt relief in no way impacts over $200 million in stimulus funds that are already flowing directly to local school districts from the federal government, or the full flexibility that local districts were given in how they opt to utilize funds coming from Columbia.
Too few are asking what we believe to be a vital question: What happens to education funding in our state in two years when all of the stimulus funds are gone? At that point the state must find a way to plug the $185 million hole that will exist on the Education Finance Act (EFA) line in the budget because, prior to supplementing the EFA line with $185 million in SFS Funds, the General Assembly opted to cut $85 million from the EFA budget. Having vetoed Part III of the budget, we could not simply veto individual lines in Part IA because vital state functions – like K-12 education – would be underfunded.

2009 (Session 118) Wednesday, January 28, 2009

January 28, 2009
The Honorable Herb Kirsh
Chairman, House Invitations Committee
503-A Blatt Building
Columbia, South Carolina 29201

Dear Chairman Kirsh:

On behalf of the American Legislative Exchange Council, the Members and staff of the House of Representatives are invited to a Legislative Reception. This event will be held on Wednesday, February 25, 2009, from 6:00 p.m. until 8:00 p.m. at the Clarion Townhouse Hotel.

Sincerely,
Frank Rogers
ALEC Private Sector Chair

2008 (Session 117) Thursday, January 17, 2008

INVITATION
On motion of Rep. LEACH, with unanimous consent, the following was taken up for immediate consideration and accepted:

January 8, 2008
The Honorable Robert W. Leach, Sr.
Chairman, House Invitations Committee
503-A Blatt Building
Columbia, South Carolina 29201

Dear Chairman Leach:

On behalf of the American Legislative Exchange Council the Members and staff of the House of Representatives are invited to a reception. This event will be held on Wednesday, February 20, 2008, from 6:00 p.m. until 8:00 p.m. at the Clarion Town House Hotel.
Sincerely,
Rick Gowdy
Director of Membership Programs

2007 (Session 117) Tuesday, January 9, 2007

INVITATIONS
On motion of Rep. LEACH, with unanimous consent, the following were taken up for immediate consideration and accepted:

January 2, 2007
The Honorable Robert W. Leach, Sr.
Chairman, House Invitations Committee
503-A Blatt Building
Columbia, South Carolina 29201

Dear Chairman Leach:
On behalf of the American Legislative Exchange Council, the Members and staff of the House of Representatives are invited to a reception. This event will be held on Tuesday, February 27, 2007, from 6:00 p.m. until 8:00 p.m. at the Clarion Town House Hotel.

2006 (Session 116) Wednesday, January 25, 2006

INVITATIONS
On motion of Rep. LEACH, with unanimous consent, the following were taken up for immediate consideration and accepted:

December 12, 2005
The Honorable Robert W. Leach, Sr.
Chairman, House Invitations Committee
503-A Blatt Building
Columbia, South Carolina 29201

Dear Chairman Leach:
On behalf of the American Legislative Exchange Council, the Members of the House of Representatives are invited to a reception. This event will be held on Tuesday, February 14, 2006, from 6:00 p.m. until 8:00 p.m. at the Clarion Town House Hotel.
Sincerely,
Gary Barrett
Director of Membership

2005 (Session 116) Wednesday, June 1, 2005

Rep. M.A. PITTS proposed the following Amendment No. 2A (Doc Name COUNCIL\PT\2721SJ05), which was adopted:
Amend the bill, as and if amended, by adding an appropriately numbered SECTION to read:
/ SECTION __. Section 2-17-90(A)(1) of the 1976 Code is amended to read:

“(1) as to members of the General Assembly, a function to which a member of the General Assembly is invited if the entire membership of the House, the Senate, or the General Assembly is invited, or one of the committees, subcommittees, joint committees, legislative caucuses or their committees or subcommittees, legislative special interest caucuses, or county legislative delegations of the General Assembly of which the legislator is a member is invited. However, the Speaker of the House and Speaker Pro Tempore of the House may be included in an invitation to one of the above groups. In addition, invitations may be extended and accepted when the invitation is extended to all members in attendance at (a) national and regional conventions and conferences of organizations for which the General Assembly pays annual dues as a membership requirement and (b) American Legislative Exchange Council conventions and conferences; /
Renumber sections to conform.
Amend title to conform.

Rep. M. A. PITTS explained the amendment.
The amendment was then adopted.

The Senate amendments, as amended, were then agreed to and the Bill was ordered returned to the Senate.

2005 (Session 116) Tuesday, February 1, 2005

INVITATIONS
On motion of Rep. LEACH, with unanimous consent, the following were taken up for immediate consideration and accepted:

January 20, 2005
The Honorable Robert W. Leach, Sr.
Chairman, House Invitations Committee
503-A Blatt Building
Columbia, South Carolina 29201

Dear Chairman Leach:

On behalf of the American Legislative Exchange Council, the Members of the South Carolina House of Representatives are invited to a reception. This event will be held on Wednesday, March 2, 2005, from 6:00 p.m. until 8:00 p.m. at the Clarion Town House Hotel.
Sincerely,
Gary Barrett
Director of Membership

2004 (Session 115) Wednesday, April 14, 2004

CONCURRENT RESOLUTION
On motion of Rep. WALKER, with unanimous consent, the following was taken up for immediate consideration:

H. 5114 (Word version) — Reps. Walker, Sinclair, Anthony, Davenport, Lee, Littlejohn, Mahaffey, W. D. Smith, Talley, Allen, Altman, Bailey, Bales, Barfield, Battle, Bingham, Bowers, Branham, Breeland, G. Brown, J. Brown, R. Brown, Cato, Ceips, Chellis, Clark, Clemmons, Clyburn, Coates, Cobb-Hunter, Coleman, Cooper, Cotty, Dantzler, Delleney, Duncan, Edge, Emory, Freeman, Frye, Gilham, Gourdine, Govan, Hagood, Hamilton, Harrell, Harrison, Harvin, Haskins, Hayes, Herbkersman, J. Hines, M. Hines, Hinson, Hosey, Howard, Huggins, Jennings, Keegan, Kennedy, Kirsh, Koon, Leach, Limehouse, Lloyd, Loftis, Lourie, Lucas, Mack, Martin, McCraw, McGee, McLeod, Merrill, Miller, Moody-Lawrence, J. H. Neal, J. M. Neal, Neilson, Ott, Owens, Parks, Perry, Phillips, Pinson, E. H. Pitts, M. A. Pitts, Quinn, Rhoad, Rice, Richardson, Rivers, Rutherford, Sandifer, Scarborough, Scott, Simrill, Skelton, D. C. Smith, F. N. Smith, G. M. Smith, G. R. Smith, J. E. Smith, J. R. Smith, Snow, Stewart, Stille, Taylor, Thompson, Toole, Townsend, Tripp, Trotter, Umphlett, Vaughn, Viers, Weeks, Whipper, White, Whitmire, Wilkins, Witherspoon and Young: A CONCURRENT RESOLUTION TO HONOR AND CONGRATULATE CAROLE C. WELLS, COMMISSIONER FOR THE SOUTH CAROLINA EMPLOYMENT SECURITY COMMISSION, ON HER RETIREMENT FROM THE COMMISSION ON JUNE 30, 2004, AND TO EXTEND BEST WISHES TO HER IN ALL OF HER FUTURE ENDEAVORS.

Whereas, serving the public sector is always a challenge and working for the citizens of the Palmetto State as a public official requires a level of dedication and commitment not traditionally seen in the average person; and

Whereas, Carole C. Wells has been serving as a Commissioner of the South Carolina Employment Security Commission (SCESC) since 1996, and is currently serving her second four-year term; and

Whereas, the first and only woman to ever hold this position, Ms. Wells is also the first Republican to lead the SCESC and her legislative experience has made her one of the most successful commissioners to lead the SCESC; and

Whereas, joining the South Carolina House of Representatives in 1986, Ms. Wells served on several committees during her ten-year stay in the House, including the Assistant Republican Caucus Leader, the South Carolina House Women’s Caucus Co-Chair, and was a member of the Ways and Means Committee and the Budget Subcommittee Chair; and

Whereas, from the South Carolina Concerned Women of America this outstanding and talented lady has won numerous awards and recognitions including the “South Carolina Woman of the Year” Award in 1988, the Rutledge College “Distinguished Citizens” Award, the South Carolina Association of Residential Care Homes “Friend of the Elderly” Award, and the Spartanburg County Citizens for Life “Guardian Angel Award”, and the Stennis Center for Southern Women in Public Service “Pacesetter” Award in both 1997 and 1998; and

Whereas, in addition to her work with the SCESC, Ms. Wells also found time to be involved in her community, volunteering for the American Red Cross, joining the Concerned Women for America, the South Carolina PTA, the Republican Women’s Club, the First Monday Club, the Former American Legislative Exchange Council, and the Former Appalachian Council of Governments; and

Whereas, Carole Wells has truly played a vital role in South Carolina life during her career of public service and the changes she has implemented as commissioner of the SCESC have made the agency one of the most efficient in state government; and

Whereas, the General Assembly, by this resolution, would like to publicly recognize and thank Carole C. Wells for her distinguished career of public service to her fellow South Carolinians as she retires from the Employment Security Commission. Now, therefore,

Be it resolved by the House of Representatives, the Senate concurring:

That the members of the General Assembly of the State of South Carolina, by this resolution, honor and congratulate Carole C. Wells, Commissioner of the South Carolina Employment Security Commission, upon her retirement from the commission on June 30, 2004, and extend best wishes to her in all of her future endeavors.

Be it further resolved that a copy of this resolution be forwarded to Carole C. Wells.

The Concurrent Resolution was agreed to and ordered sent to the Senate.

2004 (Session 115) Thursday, March 18, 2004

H. 4951–ADOPTED AND SENT TO SENATE
The following Concurrent Resolution was taken up:

H. 4951 (Word version) — Reps. Viers, Clemmons, Edge, Barfield, Miller, Hayes and Witherspoon: A CONCURRENT RESOLUTION TO REQUEST THE DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION TO NAME THE INTERCHANGE OF SOUTH CAROLINA HIGHWAY 544 AND SOUTH CAROLINA HIGHWAY 31 (CAROLINA BAYS PARKWAY) IN HORRY COUNTY IN HONOR OF REPRESENTATIVE THOMAS G. KEEGAN UPON HIS RETIREMENT FROM THE SOUTH CAROLINA HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES AND TO INSTALL APPROPRIATE MARKERS OR SIGNS AT PLACES AT THIS INTERCHANGE CONTAINING THE WORDS “THOMAS G. KEEGAN INTERCHANGE”.

Whereas, Representative Thomas G. Keegan was born April 3, 1939, in Greenwich, Connecticut, and is the son of the late Francis H. and the late Alice McCourt Keegan; and

Whereas, after graduating from Norwalk Community College in 1973, Representative Keegan went on to Iona College where he graduated with a B. S. degree in Criminal Justice in 1976; and
Whereas, in 2001, Representative Keegan was presented with an Honorary Ph.D. from Francis Marion University and an Honorary Ph.D. from the Medical University of South Carolina in 2003; and

Whereas, having previously served in the United States Marine Corps, Representative Keegan is married to Marie B. Keegan, and he has five children, Sheila, Maureen, Jacqueline, Thomas, Jr., and Molly; and

Whereas, a retired Chief of Police, the Horry County representative also serves on the Board of Trustees Emeritus of Francis Marion University, Chairman of the Grand Strand Area Transportation Committee, and is a member of the University of South Caroliniana Society and the Conway Historical Society; and

Whereas, Representative Keegan also works with the American Legislative Exchange Council, the Waccamaw Regional Planning and Development Council, the Rural Caucus and the Fire Caucus, and is Chairman of the House Tourism Caucus; and

Whereas, Representative Keegan serves as First Vice-Chairman of the House Operations and Management Committee and Second Vice-Chairman of the Ways and Means Committee, and he was instrumental in the establishment of the Infrastructure Bank, the funding mechanism for the construction of Veterans Highway and the Carolina Bays Parkway; and

Whereas, it is with honor and admiration that his colleagues wish to recognize his contributions to the State of South Carolina. Now, therefore,

Be it resolved by the House of Representatives, the Senate concurring:

That the members of the General Assembly of the State of South Carolina, by this resolution, request the Department of Transportation to name the interchange of South Carolina Highway 544 and South Carolina Highway 31 (Carolina Bays Parkway) in Horry County in honor of Representative Thomas G. Keegan upon his retirement from the South Carolina House of Representatives and to install appropriate markers or signs at places at this interchange containing the words “Thomas G. Keegan Interchange”.

Be it further resolved that a copy of this resolution be forwarded to the Department of Transportation.

The Concurrent Resolution was adopted and sent to the Senate.

2004 (Session 115) Thursday, January 22, 2004

January 21, 2004
The Honorable Robert W. Leach, Sr.
Chairman, House Invitations Committee
503-A Blatt Building
Columbia, South Carolina 29201

Dear Chairman Leach:

On behalf of the American Legislative Exchange Council the Members of the House of Representatives are invited to a reception. This event will be held at the Clarion Town House Hotel on Wednesday, February 25, 2004, from 6:00 p.m. to 8:00 pm.
Sincerely,
Gary Barrett
Director of Membership

2003 (Session 115) Thursday, June 5, 2003

SECTION 8. Section 2-17-90(A)(1) of the 1976 Code is amended to read:

“(1) as to members of the General Assembly, a function to which a member of the General Assembly is invited if the entire membership of the House, the Senate, or the General Assembly is invited, or one of the committees, subcommittees, joint committees, legislative caucuses or their committees or subcommittees, or county legislative delegations of the General Assembly of which the legislator is a member is invited. However, the Speaker of the House and Speaker Pro Tempore of the House may be included in an invitation to one of the above groups. In addition, invitations may be extended and accepted when the invitation is extended to all members in attendance at (a) national and regional conventions and conferences of organizations for which the General Assembly pays annual dues as a membership requirement and (b) American Legislative Exchange Council conventions and conferences;”

SECTION 9. Section 2-17-90(A) of the 1976 Code is amended by adding:

“(7) as to cabinet officers, a function to which all cabinet officers are invited.”

SECTION 10. Section 2-17-90(B) of the 1976 Code is amended to read:

“(B)(1) No lobbyist’s principal or person acting on behalf of a lobbyist’s principal may provide to a public official or a public employee pursuant to subsections (A)(1), (A)(2), (A)(3), (A)(4), or (A)(5), or (A)(7) the value of lodging, transportation, entertainment, food, meals, or beverages exceeding twenty-five fifty dollars in a day and two four hundred dollars in a calendar year per public official, or public employee, or cabinet officer.

(2) The daily dollar limitation in item (1) must be adjusted on January first of each even-numbered year by multiplying the base amount by the cumulative Consumer Price Index and rounding it to the nearest $5.00 amount. For purposes of this section, ‘base amount’ is the daily limitation of fifty dollars, and ‘Consumer Price Index’ means the Southeastern Consumer Price Index All Urban Consumers as published by the U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics.

(3) The State Ethics Commission must determine the cumulative increase in the Consumer Price Index through June thirtieth in odd-numbered years, and determine the adjustment, if any, to be made in the daily limitation. The State Ethics Commission shall approve the adjustment of the annual amount to a figure eight times the adjusted daily limitation.

(4) The State Ethics Commission must notify all lobbyists’ principals of the adjusted limitations at the time of registration.”

2003 (Session 115) Wednesday, January 15, 2003

INVITATIONS
On motion of Rep. LEACH, with unanimous consent, the following were taken up for immediate consideration and accepted:

Dear Chairman Leach:

March 1, 2002
The Honorable Robert W. Leach, Sr.
Chairman, House Invitations Committee
503-A Blatt Building
Columbia, South Carolina 29201

On behalf of the American Legislative Exchange Council the Members of the House of Representatives are invited to a reception. This event will be held at the Clarion Town House Hotel on Wednesday, February 26, 2003, from 7:00 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.
Sincerely,
Frank Rogers
GlaxoSmithKline

2002 (Session 114) Wednesday, February 27, 2002

INVITATIONS
On motion of Rep. FLEMING, with unanimous consent, the following were taken up for immediate consideration and accepted:

February 26, 2002
The Honorable Ron Fleming
Chairman, House Invitations Committee
503-A Blatt Building
Columbia, South Carolina 29201
Dear Rep. Fleming:

On behalf of American Legislative Exchange Council the Members of the House of Representatives are invited to a reception. This event will be held at Clarion Town House on March 6, 2002, from 6:00 p.m. until 8:00 p.m.
Sincerely,
Gary Barrett
Director of Membership

February 26, 2002
The Honorable Ron Fleming
Chairman, House Invitations Committee
503-A Blatt Building
Columbia, South Carolina 29201

2001 (Session 114) Tuesday, February 20, 2001

INVITATIONS
On motion of Rep. FLEMING, with unanimous consent, the following were taken up for immediate consideration and accepted:

February 16, 2001
The Honorable Ron Fleming
Chairman, House Invitations Committee
503-A Blatt Building
Columbia, South Carolina 29201

Dear Rep. Fleming:

On behalf of American Legislative Exchange Council the Members of the House of Representatives are invited to a reception. This event will be held at the Clarion Townhouse on March 14, 2001, from 6:00 to 8:00 p.m.
Sincerely,
Gary Barrett
Director of Membership

1996 (Session 111) Tuesday, January 9, 1996

PERSONAL DATA QUESTIONNAIRE SUMMARY
Mrs. Carole C. Wells
Home Address: Business Address:
104 Spring Valley Drive 530-D Blatt Building
Spartanburg, SC 29301 Columbia, SC 29211

1. She is married to Mr. John Eldred Wells. They have three children: John Lee Wells, Eric Todd Wells, and William Allen Wells.

2. EDUCATION: Attended Spartanburg Methodist College, Spartanburg, SC, Fall 1990 – Spring 1991, Part-time student – Night School.

3. EMPLOYMENT: 1978-1980, Real Estate Agent, Piedmont Realty; 1977-1978, Co-owner, Springfield Texaco; 1983-1987, Co-owner, Wells’ Products; 1984-1985, Professional Interviewer, Department of Commerce; 1984 to approximately 10/85, Department of Commerce/US Census Bureau, Charlotte, NC; Professional Interviewer for Job Training Programs, traveled NC, SC and Tennessee.

4. PUBLIC OFFICES HELD: 11-86 to Present, Elected to SC House of Representatives.

5. MONEY SPENT FOR CANDIDACY: $24.00, Paper and Envelopes, June 1995; $54.40, Postage, June 1995.

6. PROFESSIONAL & CIVIC ORGANIZATIONS: Appalachian Council of Governments, American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC), 1995, Membership Committee; Women in Government, Washington, D.C.; National Order of Women Legislators (NOWL), 1995, Vice President, 1993-1994, Secretary, 1991-1992, Regional Director; Spartanburg Chamber of Commerce, 1990-Present, Board of Directors; Governor’s Committee for Childhood Immunizations, 1995, Chair. American Red Cross, Volunteer; Spartanburg Christian Womens’ Club; South Carolina PTA; First Monday Club; Republican Women’s Club; STOP Drugs Now; Arts Council Advisory Board.

7. FIVE (5) LETTERS OF RECOMMENDATION: Mr. Jake Greer, Mr. Adger Earnhardt, Mr. Houston Miles, Mrs. Ann B. Ring, Ms. Constance D. Antonsen

CAROLE WELLS, being duly sworn, states as follows:
CHAIRMAN: Our counsel has some questions.
A: All right.
MR. DAVIS: Do you affirm that the answers provided on the personal data questionnaire and statement of economic interests are true and correct?
A: Yes, sir.
Q: And do you have anything that you’d like to add to these materials?
A: No, sir.
Q: Finally, have you sought pledges in violation of the no candidate rule?
A: No, sir.
CHAIRMAN: Any questions from any members of the Committee? Ms. Wells, if you have any statement you’d like to make for the record, please do so at this time.
A: Just that I have served this State for ten years now. It’s been an honor to serve the people of South Carolina and I would consider it an honor to serve on the Commission. And I would be a full-time participant. Thank you.
CHAIRMAN: That concludes the screening and …
REP. LEWIS VAUGHN: I have a question about these folks that didn’t show up, we will have another executive session and screening?
CHAIRMAN: No, sir. Unless the Committee has some … they wish to leave it open for that. I thank all of you for coming. We’ll have an executive session, if you want to stay around, later on. Frank, has a statement he’d like to make for the record, our Clerk.
MR. CAGGIANO: Mr. Chairman and Members of the Committee, I want to make a statement for the record. All of the candidates were given notification of the time, date and place of this hearing. Everyone was advised of it.
CHAIRMAN: We’ll have a brief executive session now. If you want to stay around you may, if you want to go home, you may.
MR. JOHN E. BONAPARTE, JR.: May I ask a question before we dismiss?
CHAIRMAN: Yes, sir.
MR. JOHN E. BONAPARTE, JR.: Will we receive any follow up information based upon …
CHAIRMAN: We are going to discuss that in just a moment. If you want to stay around, in a few minutes we’ll let you know our Committee’s decision is.

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About FREDERICA CADE

Most of the information you will see comes from some Federal/state Government documents or Federal/State Governm Agency. -----------------------------------------------The fellow that can only see a week ahead is always the popular fellow, for he is looking with the crowd. But the one that can see years ahead, he has a telescope but he can't make anybody believe that he has it. ~~~~Will Rogers __The woman who follows the crowd will usually go no further than the crowd. The woman who walks alone is likely to find herself in places no one has ever been before.~ Albert Einstein ~"I never work better than when I am inspired by anger; for when I am angry, I can write, pray, and preach well, for then my whole temperament is quickened, my understandingsharpen​ed, and all mundane vexations and temptations depart.” ~Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. _________________________________________________________________________________________ ~"The bosom of America is open to receive not only the Opulent and respectable Stranger, but the oppressed and persecuted of all Nations and Religions; whom we shall welcome to a participation of all our rights and privileges, if by decency and propriety of conduct they appear to merit the enjoyment".~___________________________________ George Washington, Address to the Members of the Volunteer Association of Ireland, December 2, 1783 Fredericacade@gmail.com

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